In a shock email late on Friday, AMD has released a statement to clarify the situation it is in with the manufacturing of its latest Ryzen processors. And, depending on what kind of a processor you're after, it's both a good and bad announcement.

The downside? AMD is delaying its release of the 16 core Ryzen 9 3950X. Their flagship consumer desktop CPU, which will feature a full 16 CPU cores, was originally slated for September; however it is now delayed until November. According to the company, the delay is needed due to the high demand for these parts and that time is needed to ensure that sufficient stock is available

AMD Ryzen 3000 7 & 9 Series CPUs
AnandTech Cores
Threads
Base
Freq
Boost
Freq
L2
Cache
L3
Cache
PCIe
4.0
TDP Launch Date Price
(SEP)
Ryzen 9 3950X 16C 32T 3.5 4.7 8 MB 64 MB 16+4+4 105W Nov. 2019 $749
Ryzen 9 3900X 12C 24T 3.8 4.6 6 MB 64 MB 16+4+4 105W July 2019 $499
Ryzen 7 3800X 8C 16T 3.9 4.5 4 MB 32 MB 16+4+4 105W July 2019 $399
Ryzen 7 3700X 8C 16T 3.6 4.4 4 MB 32 MB 16+4+4 65W July 2019 $329

The upside? The next generation of Threadripper processors are coming, and they will enter the market in November as well. These parts will start at 24 cores, so anyone needing single-socket CPUs with more than 12 cores will find themselves with an abundance of options to choose from.

The statement from AMD says:

We are focusing on meeting the strong demand for our 3rd generation AMD Ryzen processors in the market and now plan to launch both the AMD Ryzen 9 3950X and initial members of the 3rd Gen AMD Ryzen Threadripper processor family in volume this November. We are confident that when enthusiasts get their hands on the world’s first 16-core mainstream desktop processor and our next-generation of high-end desktop processors, the wait will be well worth it.

As far as we understand, this is nothing to do with recent reports of TSMC requiring 6 months for new 7nm orders: the silicon for these processors would have been ordered months ago, with the only real factor being binning and meeting demand. It will be interesting to see how the intersection of the 16 core with next gen Ryzen will play out. 

Related Articles:

POST A COMMENT

82 Comments

View All Comments

  • Hifihedgehog - Friday, September 20, 2019 - link

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WWaLxFIVX1s Reply
  • Gondalf - Friday, September 20, 2019 - link

    Ummm hopefully this new top of the line SKU will be able to give the advetised single core turbo and all cores turbo and definitively not on only 5% of the stockpile of chips. Yes because if the crap story will repeat itself, nearly all the reviews on selected SKUs for press from AMD will have zero relevance, but it will be only a good marketing show. IMO the delay is for a more accurate binning at TSMC. Reply
  • Xyler94 - Friday, September 20, 2019 - link

    First off, AMD never specified all-core turbos.

    Secondly, Intel mentions Max single core turbo also, but more as a guideline. Intel's chips never, under any circumstance, reach max turbo at their rated TDP. (Thermal or Power budget). Turbo speeds has always been "If power and cooling allow", even on Intel... especially on Intel too. And fun fact, usually to get the advertised turbo speeds on Intel, you can't be using any AVX, else you hit the offset.

    There's only 1 guarantee, the base clocks. But who cares about a Ghz number, when what should matter is actual performance? AMD's FX9590 was 5ghz all core, but was still a crap CPU.
    Reply
  • Jorgp2 - Sunday, September 22, 2019 - link

    >Intel's chips never, under any circumstance, reach max turbo at their rated TDP.

    What's with AMD fanboys and spreading miainformation.
    Silicon lottery is a thing, there's dies out there that can turbo at base TDP.
    And most dual core Skylake U series CPUs will run at turbo indefinitely due to the fact their turbo clock is so low.

    >Turbo speeds has always been "If power and cooling allow", even on Intel... especially on Intel too.

    No, all Intel CPUs will turbo to some extent. The amount of time they spend in turbo is what changes.
    Reply
  • Korguz - Sunday, September 22, 2019 - link

    Jorgp2 too bad intels chips dont run at base TDP under use.i guess you havent read this : http://www.phfnwk.cn/show/13544/why-intel-pro... if you do limit intels cpus to their rated TDP, their performace, goes down the toliet. the 9900K for example, TDP of 95 watts, actual usage, 150-200 watts " No, all Intel CPUs will turbo to some extent. The amount of time they spend in turbo is what changes. " ONLY if the cpu has adequate cooling. Reply
  • Jorgp2 - Sunday, September 22, 2019 - link

    You're either ignorant or misinformed. Reply
  • Korguz - Sunday, September 22, 2019 - link

    if you didnt read the link, then you are ignorant AND misinformed. i take it you had NO idea how much power intels cpus REALLY use ? Reply
  • Netmsm - Monday, September 23, 2019 - link

    I wonder how ignorant, but sure of misinformation one could be! Reply
  • olde94 - Tuesday, September 24, 2019 - link

    i'll chip in and say that it's you. you will most likely not see any chips that can go full turbo at TDP in 2019. The difference between TDP and peak load are too far from each other and while the scilicon lottery is a thing, in most cases intel will let an amazin i5 upgrade to a low tier i7 and a low tier i7 upgrade to a high tier i7. they will push it further if it comes out as a great chip, so the only case where this would normally be seen would be on a top tier i7 that has just hit the golden everything, and it's too rare to talk about for most people. Reply
  • Xyler94 - Monday, September 23, 2019 - link

    What's with Intel Fanboys instantly calling people AMD fanboys when they're simply stating things about Intel CPUs that are facts?

    And no, you're wrong on that front too. anything not a Core i5 or i7 doesn't have Turbo tech built in... unless I'm mistaken, I haven't purchased or seen a Core i3 since the Coffee Lake 8000 series...

    Turbo speeds are never a guaranteed thing, Intel admits this. I'm no fanboy, I currently own no AMD devices, and I've got 4 computers to my name (Core i7 4790k and Xeon E3-1245-V5 make up the two most important PCs I own)
    Reply

Log in

Don't have an account? Sign up now

时时彩骗局